Skip to content

Social Network Badges

Portrait Re-touching Part 3: Whitening Teeth and Brightening Eyes in Lightroom

In the first step of this tutorial, we looked at how to remove blemishes in Lightroom. We cleaned up Mario’s face a little, removing some spots and a slight scratch/scar. ┬áThen, we used the adjustment brush to apply some negative clarity and smooth out his skin.

At this point, he looks pretty good. This is no magazine cover, but it’s a subtly retouched photo that’s perfect for editorial uses. In this case, Mario’s eyes and teeth look fine. But, for some people, a little whitening in one or both areas will go a long way. So, just for the heck of it, let’s see what tool we have in Lightroom to help us do that…

Adjustment Brush, Again

In regular Adobe Photoshop, this would be a great place to use the dodge and burn tools. A normal step in the portrait re-touching workflow would be to dodge and burn around the eyes, whitening the whites a little bit and darkening the iris a little bit. It adds some contrast and pop to the picture.

But alas, no dodge/burn in Adobe Photoshop Lightroom. Those are pixel-based editing tools, and that doesn’t fit with Lightroom’s mojo. There is, however, a similar thing you can do with the adjustment brush. In the picture above, I selected the adjustment brush and zoomed in 2:! so that the eye filled most of the frame. I re-sized the brush that it was small and tried to neatly paint in the white part of Mario’s right eye. I went outside the lines a bit, and I switched to the “erase” brush to clean up the edges…

Once I had painted the area in, I ticked off the “Show Selected Mask Overlay” (that’s the reason his eye looks red in the picture to the top left) so that I could see what I was doing. Then I played with the sliders a bit to whiten his eye and remove any redness that was there.

I increased the exposure a bit first, for some subtle brightening. Then, I used the Brightness slider a bit, just for the heck of it. Finally, I desaturated a little to take out the redness. You can see the final settings I picked in the screenshot.

I’ve seen portrait re-touchers burn around the iris a bit to darken it and add contrast within the eye. You can achieve the same effect by painting a small adjustment brush around the edge of the iris and decreasing the exposure by a little bit (about a third of a stop should be nice and subtle).

Know When to Stop

The key here is to know when to stop. I was once fiddling with a picture of a football player, and I decided to whiten his eyes a little bit. I went overboard, and the extra-bright eyeball compared to his dark skin looked just a tad freaky.

Every so often, make sure you zoom out to get the full effect of your work and make sure you haven’t over-brightened something. Now that I look at it, I do think a little whitening to his eyes and teeth helped, but it’s definitely subtle. It wasn’t 100% necessary, but it looks good… and I stopped before I went too far!

That’s a good general mantra for portrait re-touching, too. At some point, just put it down. You can’t turn something craptastic into a masterpiece. More often than not, you should be able to pull a decent picture into Lightroom, take 5 or 10 minutes to touch up someone’s face, and be done with it. If that’s your goal, this simple three-part workflow should be right up your alley.

In case you jumped in at the end of the tutorial, you might want to go the first page, How to Retouch Faces and Portraits in Lightroom.

Go back: Portrait Re-touching Part 2: Softening Skim in Lightroom.

Filed Under: How to Process Your Images

Tagged: , ,

Comments

Tell us what do you think.

  1. Kristy says: April 15, 2013

    I’d like to find out more? I’d like to find out
    more details.

  2. web page says: August 15, 2013

    But the legal departments of cellphone manufacturers have slipped warnings about holding
    the phone against your head or body into the fine print of the little slip that you toss
    aside when unpacking your phone. The report also cites studies
    that state cell phone radiation can affect male fertility, damage DNA, and harmful to pregnant women.
    This Swedish study was conducted by the International Agency for Cancer Research and involved 13 different
    countries around the world.

  3. eventbrite.com says: December 10, 2013

    The book also discusses some basic nutritional
    aspects of different foods and drinks and their effect on your metabolism.

    This method of losing weight has been the overriding consideration in the Fat Burning
    Furnace product. re using your body-weight as the resistance, rather than the dumbbells, barbells, or machines.

  4. www.storenvy.com says: December 10, 2013

    There are many tree removal services in the United States which help
    in removing trees, professionally. Let me tell you from personal experience the second one hurts like hell.
    These ornaments and their creators have memories
    attached to them as well.

  5. shipping companies hiring cadets says: December 14, 2013

    USPS also offers flat rate boxes that simply mean if
    it can fit in the box, regardless of the weight, you will be charged the flat rate for that particular sized box.

    Surefire cost cutting stategies for your company to reduce Freight and Parcel Cost.
    With all the top freight companies trucking transportation service has to offer, we are one of the industry leading freight
    transport youll find.

  6. hair regrowth for black men says: January 21, 2014

    I always spent my half an hour to read this webpage’s articles every day along with a cup of coffee.

  7. Active Office Interiors says: May 2, 2014

    With the aid of an expert interior designer, you can get furnishing
    items designed according to your choice.
    Try to shop when there are sales or discounts running.
    Another feature that will help you make the right choice is pictures.

  8. paleo cereals says: December 15, 2014

    Hi, i believe that i noticed you visited my website
    thus i came to go back the want?.I am trying to
    to find issues to improve my website!I assume its good enough to make use of some
    of your ideas!!

Add a Comment

Fill in the form and submit.

About Digital Photography How To

Digital Photography How To is intended to be a guide to people learning how to use their digital SLR cameras. Three years ago, I had never picked up a camera; now, I produce a yearbook every year and I moonlight as a professional photographer.

I write this website to share what I've learned in that time. The topics will range from truly beginners topics, to tutorials for post processing, to resources for yearbook and graphic design, to thoughts on transitioning from a hobbyist to a professional. Keep up to date by subscribing to the RSS feed.

About the Author

Digital Photography How To is written by Brian Rock. In addition to being a photographer, he's an educator. He teaches high school history, he's the advisor of the school yearbook, and he trains his kids to do all of the photography for the yearbook.

You can connect with him directly on Google Plus.